Domain Internet Changes

Domain names are all the hype today. Whether you are talking .club, condos, or .guru, among the currently available extensions on the market. But what about all of the domains that are coming soon? Close to 2000 possible extensions may one day be available for use.

If you buy a new domain name extension or gTLD (generic top-level domain) can you use it and / or sell it as you would with other extensions? It seems that there registries that are conjuring up these new novelty extensions are controlling the process of the entire life cycle for their gTLDs. They determine when the registrars can sell them, including pre-registration and priority registration and even auctions for competing bidders for the same domain name who priority registered a domain with different registrars. Can you imagine that there are auctions for domain names that are not even available yet? Domain names that have not yet been used for a website and have not even been available as forwarding domains are highly valued and be sold before there are yet bought.

What is the deal with the domain Internet changes Is this madness? Possibly this domain name insanity is incurable. Trying to secure the right domain name can be maddening. Many registrar’s may offers promotional gimmicks that seem to promise you a desired domain name at one of the many new extensions. But what can they really offer you other than notification, by e-mail, when the gTLD becomes available? That is, unless you are willing and able to pay for pre-registration or priority registration (much more costly) and this is dependent upon the sunrise or release date of the domain name.

Domain names are now being screened by an intake clearing house to ensure that trademarks are respected and upheld, by the trademark holder / owner. It used to be that someone could register any business name, as domain name, even if one did not own the business name proper – having registered it with the required regulatory authority. Perhaps the new extensions gTLDs were created to ensure that rightful trademark owners can fairly register the business name as their own domain name.

But will this process actually restrict unlawful registrations across the board for all gTLDs? Or is the clearing house only monitoring and enforcing for requested gTLDs to ensure that trademark holders will gain a suitable gTLD for their business name? If so, how will this process be any different from the initial launch of the .com extension where some domainers opted to capitalize on acquiring namesakes of well known brands and then offering the gTLD for sale at an outrageously high price at auction?

Originally posted 2015-02-02 05:28:59.

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